Stay Safe this Thanksgiving

Thanksgiving is a special holiday known for bringing together family and friends. But as with many holidays, it also brings along potential hazards for dogs and cats.

Follow these tips to keep your pets healthy and safe during the November holiday.

Be Careful with Food

Keep your feast to yourself! Common holiday foods including garlic, onions, raisins, grapes and chocolate often prove fatal for pets. Even that turkey skin they beg for can lead to pancreatitis in some. In addition to the list of unsafe foods below, we’ve included some safer options that they can enjoy in moderation.

Unsafe Foods

  • Turkey bones and turkey skin
  • Onions, chives, and garlic
  • Blue and brie cheeses
  • Alcohol and coffee
  • Butter, sour cream, and other fatty foods
  • Creamed peas
  • Salt and salty snacks
  • Chocolate
  • Grapes and raisins
  • Yeast dough
  • Diet peanut butter (xylitol)
  • Corn cobs
  • Gravy and stuffing
  • Nuts

Safe Foods

  • Turkey meat
  • Pumpkin
  • Some cheeses (cheddar, mozzarella, and jack)
  • Cooked potatoes & cooked sweet potatoes
  • Peas
  • Popcorn (no salt or butter)
  • Apple slices (no seeds)
  • Green beans and beans
  • Ripe tomatoes
  • Peanuts and peanut butter
  • Corn
  • Carrots
  • Celery
  • Zucchini

Beyond the obvious way pets may encounter toxic foods (being fed by someone who doesn’t know better), some animals are mischievous enough to get their paws on scraps through other methods. A tempting turkey carcass on the counter might be irresistible to your cat, while a trash can filled with scraps could catch your dog’s attention from across the room. Keep an eye out!

If you have reason to believe your pet has eaten something they shouldn’t have, call a local veterinary emergency clinic immediately. You may also want to contact the ASPCA Poison Control Hotline (888-426-4435) or the Pet Poison Helpline (855-764-7661).

Pets and Guests

If you’re in charge of hosting the party (or if your pets are lucky enough to be invited to someone else’s house), plan ahead to make the experience less stressful for all parties involved. Some animals can be shy around new people, and some people can be equally shy around unfamiliar animals. Bring treats and distractions along, like a favorite toy or a delicious KONG, as a diversion.

Additionally, make sure everyone in the house knows what doors to keep closed. Nothing ruins holiday run like scouring the neighborhood for a runaway pet in the middle of dinner. As with all holidays, we recommend ensuring your pet’s identification tags have up-to-date information so they can be promptly returned to you if they become lost, and that their microchip is registered at 24Pet.

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